info

2 Bank Street, Candor, NY 13743 / 607-659-7258

HOURS

Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 2 pm-5 pm
Tuesday & Thursday: 10 am- noon; 2 pm- 5 pm; 6 pm- 8 pm (no Tuesday morning hours in summer)
Saturday: 10 am- noon; 2 pm- 4pm

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Annual Meeting is January 13

Each year the Candor Free Library Association holds an annual meeting to go over annual reports and elect trustees to serve on the board. This year's meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, January 13 at 6:30 7:00 pm.

While the meeting is open to the public, only association members have voting privileges. You can find out more about becoming a library association member by calling the library.

The regular Board of Trustees meeting will follow the annual meeting.

Wednesday, December 2, 2015

Seasonal Stories

This is the season for snowball fights, hot cocoa, and reading together. Here are a few of the holiday books Candor has on the shelves, beginning with Hanukkah (which starts December 6) and ending with Kwanzaa (from December 26 to New Year's Day)



In the month of Kislev : a story for Hanukkah, by Jina Jaffe.
Without money for even a single latke, the Mendel children stand under the window of the wealthy merchant, Feive. They just want to savor the rich scent of his golden latkes. But Feivel doesn't share anything, and when he discovers the children on the eighth night he insists they face Rabbi Yonah's judgment.

Bubbie and Zadie come to my house : a story for Hanukkah, by Daniel Halevi Bloom.
Bubbie and Zadie are magical grandparents who arrive on the first night of Hanukkah. They arrive in time to share potato latkes, sing along while the boy and his sister spin the dreidel, and recall stories about the Maccabees and the small bit of oil that lighted the lamps for eight days. Before soaring off to visit other children around the world, the grandparents promise to return for the holiday each year. 

Shooting at the stars : the Christmas truce of 1914, by John Hendrix.
 In 1914 France, a British soldier writes to his mother about the strange events of Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Despite fierce fighting earlier from both sides, Allied and German soldiers ceased firing and came together on the battlefield to celebrate the holiday. They sang carols, exchanged gifts, and even lit Christmas trees. But as the holiday came to a close, they returned to their separate trenches to await orders for the war to begin again.
The story is based on fact, with additional information about World War I and the Christmas Truce and its aftermath, and an archival photograph taken during the Truce.

Holidays are a great time to read your old favorites, like How the Grinch stole Christmas by Dr. Seuss.
And don't forget a certain infamous demanding mouse...
If you take a mouse to the movies, by Laura Numeroff
When a boy takes a mouse to the movies, the mouse wants popcorn, which he strings together and wants to hang on the Christmas tree that the boy buys for him. On the way home, the mouse wants to play in the snow but then needs to warm up at home, where he sings Christmas carols and wants to decorate the tree. His popcorn string is missing, so he wants to make another, which reminds him of the movies . . .

The story of Kwanzaa, by Donna L. Washington
 This is an introduction to Kwanzaa that provides a brief sketch of African-American history and the origins of the festival. It explains the structure and customs of the seven days of Kwanzaa, and includes a craft and cooking project.

For more holiday stories, check out this post, and this one.

Sunday, November 8, 2015

Books for Veterans Day

On Veterans Day we honor those who have served in the armed forces. If you're looking for stories about military service - fact or fiction - there are a number on the shelves. Below is a sampling of some Veterans Day reading at Candor Free Library. Remember the parade on Wednesday


On the Adult shelves you'll find great fiction and nonfiction:
Home front by Kristin Hannah (large print)
 Like many couples, Michael and Jolene Zarkades face the pressures of everyday life -- children, careers, bills, chores -- even as their twelve-year marriage is faltering. Then Iraq erupts and Jolene is deployed leaving defense attorney Michael to be the single parent to their two girls -- a role that's foreign to him

Vietnam mailbag : voices from the war : 1968-1972 by Nancy E. Lynch
 Nancy Lynch wrote a column, "Vietnam Mailbag", for the Wilmington News Journal. This book is based on nearly 900 letters to her from Delawareans who fought there then as well as some contemporary interviews with some of these veterans


 Brotherhood of battle : the Civil War soldiers and families of Newark Valley, New York by Marsh, Jerald

Dear friend Amelia : the Civil War letters of Private John Tidd by Jordan, Mary.

There are some great books over on the children's and young adult shelves as well:
US Military Weapons and Artillery, by Carol Shank and Weapons of World War I and Weapons of World War II by Matt Doeden.
 Not all the books are about weapons, though. Alison Hart's written a great historical fiction book about World War I from a dog's point of view: Darling, Mercy Dog of World War I. There are a number of American Girl books about girls taking on the roles of heroes in various wars including Caroline's Secret Message, by Kathleen Ernst. This is about the War of 1812 and there are five books that follow Caroline's story.
Walter Dean Myers has written a gritty YA novel about the war in Iraq: Sunrise over Fallujah.

And Ellen Emerson White writes about the Vietnam war in Where have all the flowers gone? : the diary of Molly Mackenzie Flaherty. It's 1968 in Massachusetts, and 15-year old Molly's brother brother Patrick goes to fight in Vietnam. Molly records in her diary how she misses her brother, volunteers at a Veterans' Administration Hospital, and tries to make sense of the war and the tumultuous events in the United States.

Friday, October 23, 2015

Read Magazines for Free



Do you know that you can read magazines for free on your computer, laptop, smartphone, ipad, or Kindle? All you need is a library card from the Candor Free Library. This will then allow you connect to the Finger Lakes Library System online.  Once connected, you will go to the Zinio e-magazine site to proceed to get your digital copy.

There are currently 103 different magazine titles available, and more may be added.  You will find several choices for men, women, teens, and children in genres such as art, computers, finance, fitness, food, music, nature, news, travel, and many more. You can read the magazines online or download them for later reading. There is no limit to the number of magazines you can download at one time and you may keep them forever. If you are looking for a past issue of a magazine, you can find that there, also.

Here is how you connect to Zinio:
  1. If you don’t already have one, get a library card at the Candor Free Library.
  2. Use your library card number and the last 4 digits of the phone number you used to obtain your library card to connect online to the Finger Lakes Library System at http://www.flls.org.
  3. Click on Zinio e-magazines on the left side of the screen.
  4. Once on the Zinio site, if you want to check out a magazine, you will need to create an account with Zinio. You register with your email address and create a password. This password is different from your library password.
Devices compatible with Zinio: (For the first 4 you need to download the magazine in order to read it; #5 allows you to instantly read the magazine by streaming) 
  1. iPad – get the Zinio for Libraries app at the iTunes store.
  2. iPhone - get the Zinio for Libraries app at the iTunes store.
  3. Android – get the Zinio for Libraries app at the Google Play store.
  4. Kindle Fire HD/HDX - get the Zinio for Libraries app at the Amazon store.
  5. Some PC and Mac laptops and computers may work with Zinio, but others may not. According to the Zinio website, “Depending upon your geographic location, the equipment that you are using to access the Site, the bandwidth available to you and other factors, you may not have access to streaming and/or downloadable Site Content.”
Browse and Check Out:
  1. Browse magazines to add to your personal Zinio for Libraries viewer account.
  2. Search by genre, title, alphabet, or keyword.
  3. Click on the current cover to view magazine details for current or back issues (as available)
      • Check out the newest issue or back issues.
      •  Enjoy unlimited checkouts.
      • Opt-in to be notified by email when new issues are added to your magazine collection.
  4. Check out and log in – Click the Checkout button and either Create New Account or LogIn.
  5. If you want to select additional magazines to add to your personal reading collection, click on the Keep Browsing button. 
Manage Checked-Out Magazines:
  1. My Collection - Read magazines from within your reading collection.
  2. Select the My Collection link at the top right corner of the Zinio page to access all previously checked-out magazines.
  3. Click on the cover of the magazine you wish to read or the Read Now icon.
  4. Remove unwanted issues by selecting the trash icon.
Reading with Mobile Devices:

  1. Enhance your reading experience with mobile device apps, including those for iPad and iPhone, Android, Kindle Fire HD/HDX (The Kindle Fire app requires enabling your device to accept apps from “other” non-Kindle Store sources).
  2.  Access your app store directly or from the links provided on the Zinio library collection page.
  3. Mobile apps require a downloaded edition of the magazine
  4. To check out additional magazines from our library, you will need to go back in your browser to your library collection page. All checkouts are completed in the browser. The apps are for Reading Only.

Help  - Click on the word "help" on the bottom right of the Zinio page.
  1. Check Frequently Asked Questions
  2. Look at the User Guide for your device
  3. Watch a Tutorial about using your device to access magazines